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Young Says COVID-19 Relief Talks At Impasse, Won’t Say If Trump Executive Orders Are Legal

By Brandon Smith, IPB News | Published on in Government, Health, Politics
U.S. Sen. Todd Young (R-Ind.) says some of his priorities for the next federal relief bill include more support for the country’s hardest-hit businesses, telehealth and child care. (Justin Hicks/IPB News)
U.S. Sen. Todd Young (R-Ind.) says some of his priorities for the next federal relief bill include more support for the country’s hardest-hit businesses, telehealth and child care. (Justin Hicks/IPB News)

U.S. Sen. Todd Young (R-Ind.) says talks over another federal coronavirus relief package remain at an impasse.

Congressional Democrats have been negotiating with the White House as Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) said he couldn’t get agreement within his GOP caucus for a package.

Young said some of his priorities for the next federal relief bill include more support for the country’s hardest-hit businesses, telehealth and child care.

“In the midst of a pandemic, this is essential because people cannot go back to work unless they have child care,” Young said.

The senior Hoosier senator expressed some support for helping state and local governments fill holes in their budgets caused by COVID-19’s disastrous impact on the economy. But the Senate Republican proposal doesn’t include any such help.

Young wouldn’t say whether he thinks President Donald Trump’s recent executive orders – including a payroll tax holiday – are legal, though he said they’re not optimal.

“It’s a national emergency and by my reckoning, the president feels as though he had no other response,” Young said.

READ MORE: Do I Have To Wear A Face Mask? What You Need To Know About Indiana’s New Mandate

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Young said Democrats are to blame for the impasse, claiming they refuse to agree to anything but the House’s $3 trillion proposal. Yet Democratic leaders last week offered to come down by a $1 trillion if Republicans met them in the middle.

Contact reporter Brandon at bsmith@ipbs.org or follow him on Twitter at @brandonjsmith5.